Posts Tagged ‘music’

Teaser 3

 

So I finally got around to launching my Society6 store a few days ago. Hurray!

Recently I launched my 12th t-shirt with Mlabbas, the Tah Smiley tee, that you can see on the lower right of the above snapshot from Society6, so I realized it was time to go online; and hopefully beyond Amman, Jordan.

No, I am not swimming in money like Scrooge McDuck ;-})

With each new line I draw I learn more about myself as an illustrator. The illustrations that I’ve uploaded are the pieces that I think are good in terms of themes and execution.

Teaser 4

Society6 allows anyone to purchase my posters/prints/tshirts with the push of a botton – okay, now I am bordering on shameless self-promotion, which is in a way the objective of this blog.

I will soon get back to fighting crime; I promise ;-})

Until then … to visit my Society6 store just click on this blue … I mean red … magical link: http://www.society6.com/SardineArt

Good day all …

Sardine a.k.a Mike V. Derderian a.k.a A Brick in The Head 

2014

 

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If I have never stopped playing guitar in 2003 I would have most probably ended up adopting the style of music that inspired this evening’s poster.

The Devil's Orchard - Opeth

Opeth’s The Devil’s Orchard has a classical timeless feel to it, especially when it comes to the guitar play. This is a song that you will continue to listen to for years to come.

The guitar echoes of despair, a human emotion that a lot of us experience every now and then; some more than others.

It reminded me of Chris Rea’s Nothing to Fear!

 

This is one reason why we often find solace in the despair of others – it makes us realize and without a doubt that we are all the same in the end.

This poster is a reflection of the official video. It comes part of my Cinerama, minimal series that I started producing a couple of years ago. Here is the link to the entire collection on Behance, Vol. I http://bit.ly/1ojcafX

By the way if you find my work interesting you can examine my artwork and updates on my Facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/SardineArt

 

From within the darkest corners of despair man found his gods and demons.

Hope you find yours!

I am finding mine with every line I write; and every line I draw.

If you know anyone who wants something different pass on my e-mail to them: mikevderderian@yahoo.com ;-})

This journalist, writer and illustrator is done fulfilling the dreams of ass wipes. Alas, this year I wasted two months on one major ass wipe. Never again! It is time for me to Catch The Rainbow as the song goes; my own rainbow.

A good day to all those who are following my lines, written and drawn. Thank you for your “Likes” and “Comments!” It means a lot to me.

Sardine, a.k.a. Mike V. Derderian, 2014

P.S: I am usually hush hush when it comes to business dealings and work experiences, especially bad ones, but this ass wipe deserved an honorable mention ;-})

I haven’t written a movie review, or a blog post for that matter, in ages.

So here is a short one!

It would be great to do a comparative study of Kasabian’s Empire (2006) and The Charge of the Light Brigade by Tony Richardson (1968).

 

Empire’s color, light and texture is so reminiscent of the 1960s cinematography and the grainy texture that can be attributed to the manner by which a film stock is developed.

Both films, the music video and the motion picture, also present a case study of the lives of generals and soldiers in that era, in 1854, and of course the overall futility of war – I am thinking from an existential view point rather than a moral one.

Evil must be fought, however, sometimes those who give the orders are no less evil than the ones they are fighting.

Here is trailer for The Charge of the Light Brigade.

 

Guess this is my way of saying I really love Kasabian, their music and their approach to shooting music videos.

Honorable mention: Vlad The Impaler.

 

I apologize for not posting regularly but I’ve been going through a lot in terms of work and career changes.

I also been listening to more music part of my life as a radio Disc Jockey and news presenter at Radio Jordan’s 96.3 FM, The English Service.

My shows are on Mondays, Thursdays and Saturdays between 9:15 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.

Hope you are doing well in this crazy beautiful world that is plagued by blood thirsty idiots.

Good day all …

Mike V. Derderian

Writer & Illustrator

http://www.facebook.com/SardineArt

May 2014

“It never rains but it pours!”

So they say …

But I know … better!

Life in the past few months threw some rather interesting challenges in my face.

I am not going to talk about these challenges as this is not a rant blog. However, I am going to talk about my latest project Rock Arabical, part of my work as an illustrator.

My background in radio, love of music and my work as a Disc Jockey, I’ve been working at Radio Jordan 96.3 FM since 2003, were the main reasons that I started this design series.

I am not a type designer but I am a t-shirt designer. I now have over 20 t-shirt designs and merchandise with Mlabbas, a t-shirt company based in Amman, Jordan.

Rock Arabica is a typography and logo design series through which I turned renowned rock band logos into Arabic ones.

The best part about producing these rock band logos was the challenge I faced in maintaining the spirit of the original design by using the geometry and angles of the original logos. 

My project on Behance:

https://www.behance.net/gallery/Rock-Arabica-Vol-I-by-Sardine/14251713

The designs that you are about to see were all created using Adobe Illustrator CS5 (the construct of the type) and finished with Adobe Photoshop CS5 (the distress layer).

Remember: Never go full distress on a design as it is an overkill!

Hope you love them enough to buy the t-shirt ;-})

Mike V. Derderian,
Writer, Illustrator & Designer,
Sardine

Iron Maiden Arabic by Mike V. Derderian

Led Zeppelin Arabic Full by Mike V. Derderian

Pink Floyd Arabic by Mike V. Derderian

Nirvana Arabica by Mike V. Derderian

Def Leppard Arabic by Mike V. Derderian

Savatage Arabic by Mike V. Derderian

Opeth Arabic by Mike V. Derderian

Black Sabbath Arabic by Mike V. Derderia

The Doors Arabic by Mike V. Derderian

AC DC Arabic by Mike V. Derderian

Metallica Arabic by Mike V. Derderian

Queen Arabic by Mike V. Derderian

By Mike V. Derderian

A passionate embrace is flooded by streams of light. Gold yellow waves interspersed with darker shades the color of violet, red, orange and white engulf a man and a woman in a state of love.

Stand still, keep quite and watch the enamored couple; the only two who managed to find each other unlike the other men and women who roam the dream-like illuminated pieces of Hammoud Chantout, that are now hanging at Dar Al-Anda Art Gallery in Lweibdeh.

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State of Life, that measures 145 x 120 cm, is but one of the many impressive canvases that Chantout’s hands created. It  conjures up Gustav Klimt’s The Kiss. Chantout’s two lovers are caught in a vortex of colors that embody the enlightenment that their love brought fourth.

Unlike the two in State of Life, a title that Chantout used with other pieces, the others appear to be aloof and detached. Viewers will find them standing next to objects that Chantout’s brush brilliantly produced.

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Why is that male artist standing a few meters away from a red chair, while another, a female artist, is leaning on a rail amidst a haze of earthly tones?

Some of Chantout’s colorful personages, and I say colorful because uneven patches of color formulate their construct, are standing next to bright colored pieces of furniture while others are standing under trees that give away echoes of Africa.

Viewers crossing the entrance hall will find a set of six exquisite miniature tableaux to their right. Chantout cleverly created a landscape broken down to six pieces. Each pieces tells part of a story that could have happened anywhere around the world. The architectural edifices that Chantout relies on to create his sceneries give out the feel of Syrian rural mud houses.

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Born in 1956 Chantout graduated from the Suhail Al-Ahdab Art Center in Hama, Syria in 1975. In 1976 he was admitted to the Faculty of Fine Art with a 1st rank. He has been holding solo and collective exhibitions in Syria, Lebanon, Jordan, Kuwait, Canada, and Turkey since 1972.

At Dar Al-Anda one will also come across a book entitled Chantout and that allows viewers to take a glance at his impressive volume of  work.

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Copies of this book that holds haunting images that found their way out of Chantout’s beautiful mind are most probably on sale.

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The female figure dominates a lot of Chantout’s pieces.

The Bride with the White Mask (70 x 100 cm), Paradise (70 x 100 cm), Hope (80 x 100 cm), Angel (60 x 70 cm) and A Princess from One Thousand Nights (60 x 70 cm) are a celebration of the femme and her role in the building of humanity and the birth of mythology’; a legacy that some are trying to bury.

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Thanks to such poignant pieces by Chantout the celebration continues, and another memory is added to humanity’s collective memory, to remind us of the  femme that haunted the minds of artists throughout the ages.

With Adam’s Apple (60 x 70 cm), and that Dar Al Anda used for the cover of their beautifully designed brochure, a must have, Chantout offers us an interpretation of the ultimate illumination: Knowledge.

Illumination springs from darkness and as one goes through the details of Chantout’s pieces a balance is found. Where there is darkness there are also corners that are illuminated; corners where artists like Chantout, and the likes of him over the centuries, have found themselves standing to illuminate the path for the rest of us.

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Don’t search for clear answers in a painting, enjoy the emotions it yields within you. The above piece Oriental Princess (122 x 100 cm) is but one of many of Chantout’s pieces that will generate discourse in the minds of viewers.

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Anyone entering Dar Al Anda, before Chantout’s Illuminations exhibition wraps on April 25, will come across a torrent of colors and lines that carry within their folds a lot of passion and interpretations that will stir ones’ imagination.

For more information about Dar Al-Anda go to http://www.daralanda.com

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A footnote:

1 … 2 …  3 … 4 …

The text pointer flashed a couple of times before he started typing.

Two years passed since he last wrote a professional art review, a review that used to be published in The Star on a weekly basis; a review that used to be edited. He was edited by three individuals. The one he loved most passed away a few months ago. Rest in peace Abu Hassan.

In 2003 I joined The Star weekly as an intern. My dear father went with me. I managed to get a shot at writing an art review of a botanical exhibition at The Instituto Cervantes in Amman. It was a successful piece even though the exhibition and the description of the pieces were in Spanish. They were impressed and I started getting paid on a freelance basis. After a few weeks I managed to convince the editor that I would be able to write cinema reviews. I was given a column and was asked to come up with a name. Cinerama was born. After a year I got the job and I was a staff writer. Why a year? That’s another story for another blog post.

The above few lines demonstrate how I felt as I wrote this review after three years of not writing any. It only took me a moment to decide. I was outside Dar Al-Anda running an errand.

“It has been so long. Don’t you miss immersing yourself  in art? Go in!” I thought to myself. It was quite an emotional experience that reminded me of the eight years I’ve spent visiting art galleries in my Amman part of my work as a journalist; an experience I loved.

Hopefully I will get back to doing this more often ;-})