Posts Tagged ‘Gaza’

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Satan wept and wept.
Death’s scythe through his beloved earth mercilessly swept.

His black crystalline tears tore through the scorched earth upon which he knelt.
All the monsters, hydras, ghouls, djinn and demons, in his realm his anguish felt.

“I have no part in this! Do you hear me? I have no part in this! You have created monsters of your own!” his vociferous voice echoed.

No answer was returned.

Silence prevailed as Death gleefully cut through men, women, and children … young and old.

Satan wept and wept.

Were they tears of joy or sadness?
None dared ask!

When Satan Wept Humanity
by Manuel V. Derida, 1989

Good day all. I wish to thank those of you who still read my words; the words that are not echoing within the corners of this blog as much. It has been a strange year, and in the past few weeks it has become stranger.

The world is burning and one cannot but try to find some sanity through work.

When I have more words to add here you will be the first to know.

For more of Manuel V. Derida’s writings please visit Thoughts from within a Sardine Can Facebook page http://on.fb.me/1mAwzgM

Art: Satan by Mike V. Derderian, pencil and ink on paper, 2014.

 

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Click. Click. Click! His fingers hit the keys. Pause!

The clicks silently died. Some motherfucker piece of shit lied! They always do with sick minds that they hide under a well coiffed hairdo! Click. Click. Click! Another pause! Confusion slit the throat of his thoughts like a slithering assassin under the shadow of the night. Call it a mental fight or a fanciful flight amidst the clouds that obstruct his jaded jilted judgment … day has arrived.

Children dying … No! Children being killed! The Arab world, the treacherous parts, with empty promises is filled. Lecherous Oil Sheikhs are with our blood thrilled. I hear the weather in Kabul at this time of the year is quite beautiful. Get a hint assholes! Pack up your bags and settle in the mountainous mosquito and cockroach filled holes.

The newborn crucifix holders aren’t any better he thought. Fuck that second cumming shit! Click. Click. Click! Grab a gun and splatter your brain here and thither on the wall of silence. Book a one way ticket to Armageddon. Suck on the cold barrel and vaya con Dios.

Click. Click! Click!

The writer, with a half-dead cigarette hanging between his cracked lips, the keys again hit. Broken sentences falling from his mouth and unto the page; a tissue to his mental drooling.

Click. Click. Click! Who is he fooling?

A third pause! He takes a long look in the mirror where he sees a misfit (by choice) sitting behind a mint green Olivetti typing and typing …

Click. Click. Click. Click. Click. Click. Click. Click. Click. Click. Click. Click …

Their innocent faces and miniscule bodies became part of the photographs in the photo book that I’ve been carrying around in my shoulder bag for the past few days. I needed the book to remind myself that I had a video interview to edit and finish.

Every single page in the book had a child, or two and more, huddled together, innocently smiling or gawking at the camera in bewilderment. Like an eye catching detail, painted with vivid colors in the edge, center or upper right or lower left of a painting, the Palestinian children standing next to graffiti art produced by the Hamas and Fatah artists give Mia Gröndahl’s Gaza Graffiti: Messages of Love and Politics a humanitarian aspect.

Gaza Graffiti: Messages of Love and Politics is more than a photo archive of the graffiti art movement in Gaza that according to the book started in 1987; it is a book reflective of a photojournalist’s journey; a photojournalist who was intent on capturing the bigger picture but found herself capturing pictures that came with smaller pictures within: The children of Gaza.

Gröndahl, who was born in 1951, and lives in Cairo and Southern Sweden, is a photojournalist and the author of another photo book In Hope and Despair: Life in the Palestinian Refugee Camp (AUC Press, 2003).

She was aided by Sami Abu Salem, a Palestinian journalist from Gaza, who eventually became her eyes and ears (her guide and interpreter).

Children with glittering eyes and friendly smiles peer into our own eyes through Gröndahl’s lens that also caught, as she puts it in the first pages of her book, the gray walls of Gaza that were heavily splashed with the spray paint colors of graffiti artists from Hamas and Fatah. The majority of graffiti pieces in this amazing book were produced part of an unofficial graffiti war between the two warring factions.

In Gaza Graffiti: Messages of Love and Politics you will find politicised graffiti art, slogans and murals of Palestinian martyrs from both sides of the Palestinian political spectrum. Some are amazing and some are simple; and you can also go as far as saying childish.  You will also spot congratulatory letters of Hajj, marriage and other social occasions worth celebrating with a graffiti.

I had the pleasure of meeting Gröndahl and Abu Salem during the launch and signing of her book part of The Festival of Alternative Arts: Urban Expressions in 2010. Prior to our interview at books@café I interviewed Miss Gröndahl and Her Excellency Mrs. Charlotta Sparre on my morning radio show on 96.3 FM, Radio Jordan.

You can find the video interview that I conducted, shot and edited here. Just click on this link Gaza Graffiti: Messages of Love and Politics, The Interview

Blog post photo by Mia Gröndahl from Gaza Graffiti: Messages of Love and Politics